What is the most popular wood for hardwood flooring?

Oak Hardwood Flooring By far the most popular species of hardwood flooring is oak, most likely due to its distinctive characteristics, longevity and durability. It is known for being a very beautiful species of wood thanks to its gold tone and its caramel tones that make any space feel cozy; perfect for family homes.

What is the most popular wood for hardwood flooring?

Oak Hardwood Flooring By far the most popular species of hardwood flooring is oak, most likely due to its distinctive characteristics, longevity and durability. It is known for being a very beautiful species of wood thanks to its gold tone and its caramel tones that make any space feel cozy; perfect for family homes. Oak is the most common hardwood flooring option in the United States, and for good reason. The grain is attractive, and while its natural colors are pleasant, it also stains very well (so you can get it in just about any color you want).

In the U.S. UU. The closest competitors are ash, which accounts for only about 11%, and maple with 8%, while ash, cherry, alder and other species each account for less than 5%, some significantly less. In total, these trees represent approximately 40% of trees in the U.S.

As by far the most abundant domestic hardwood, it's no wonder that oak in general is also the most popular choice for flooring in this country, and red oak in particular. In addition to being abundant and therefore more affordable, Red Oak is one of the most stain friendly woods. This means you can create the look you want without breaking the bank, and you can change the look later with a simple sand finish. Red oak generally shows moderate to heavy grain with modest color variations.

Its natural color tends to range from light creamy reddish pinks (hence the “red oak”) to brown tones. And, with a Janka rating of approximately 1290, red oak tends to hold up well under wear, but is flexible enough not to crack or split under pressure. Like its dyed sister, white oak is plentiful and dyes well. Its grain is similar and its color variation is moderate, but unlike red oak, white oak tends to be more golden to gray in color.

White oak is also harder (1360 on the Janka scale) and has proven to be an exceptionally stable hardwood, a big advantage for floors. Grown primarily in Canada and the northern regions of the U.S. Although it doesn't stain as well as oak, its natural creamy color, subtle grain pattern, and minimal color variation make it perfect for floors with a natural finish. Because maple wood is less porous, with a Janka rating of 1450 (one of the reasons it's less stain friendly), it tends to be somewhat more resistant to dents and scratches.

Also known as American black walnut and its variations, walnut is one of the most beautiful and sophisticated hardwood species grown in North America. The heartwood and sapwood of the walnut vary greatly in color, and the wood in the innermost part of the tree varies from deep brown to almost purplish black. In contrast, the wood in the outer rings of the tree tends to be tan to almost white in color. Quite often, walnut floors will have a straight, open grain, but it is also known for the swirling and wavy patterns that sometimes appear.

Although it's not as hard as other hardwoods (only 1010 on the Janka scale), if you're looking for a refined and elegant look for your floors, walnut can be a good choice. Like maple, cherry is a dense hardwood with a very subtle grain that is usually left unstained. Less dramatic than its popular exotic counterpart, Brazilian cherry, American cherry has a natural reddish brown color that tends to deepen over time and brings attractive warmth and richness to a room. Beech is one of the lightest domestic hardwoods.

It ranges from pale white to reddish brown and has a fine, straight grain, which gives it a relatively uniform texture. With a Janka rating of around 1300, it's easily as durable as red oak, but creates a more open and airy feel due to its pale color and understated texture. Like walnut, ash varies significantly in color, from heartwood, which can be from light tan to dark brown, to sapwood, which is creamy white in color. With a shade more yellow than other pale woods such as white oak and beech, ash is ideal for bringing warmth to a room while maintaining a sense of light and openness.

The best hardwood floors are made with wood species that are available and you guessed it very hard. Oak floors, maple floors, and cherry floors are good choices. Other species include bamboo (which is actually an herb), walnut, ash and mahogany. You'll pay a higher price for more exotic species, such as teak, pitcher and mesquite.

Make sure the hardwood floor you choose comes from sustainably exploited forests. Add warmth and timeless beauty to your kitchen with classic hardwood floors that come in a variety of wood types, designs, and finishes. Most birch trees available are yellow, a soft wood, suitable for low traffic, less resistant to damage %26 with less dimensional stability. That said, it can be difficult to determine which hardwood species will be best for your Shawnee home.

Although these types of wood are softer and better suited for low traffic, their elegant beauty is what makes them popular. Pine is durable, and because it's relatively easy to grow, it's considered one of the greenest flooring options when it comes to hardwood floors. Traditional hardwood floors feature solid wood planks, while designer hardwood floors offer the real look with more application options at a slightly lower cost. As you can probably tell from the term, domestic hardwoods are timbers from trees that grow in North American forests, mainly in the United States and Canada.

It is usually sold as a modestly priced alternative to domestic hardwood species and has even been called “oriental teak”. Jatoba vaguely resembles mahogany, but has a more natural sheen than many other types of hardwood. If you're looking for the strongest American hardwood species used for flooring, that honor belongs to the (surprisingly) moderately priced American walnut, priced at 1820 on the Janka scale. Hardness is related to how well a wood resists dents% 26% to scratches; and also to how much wood will expand and contract under changes in temperature and humidity.

Secondly, due to the heavy grain of oak, it helps hide scratches and dents better than most other hardwoods. Continuously explores new techniques and topics around hardwood floors for your homes and offices. The hardest American hardwood species commonly used for flooring, American walnut is surprisingly modest in terms of price. Laminated or engineered wood, talk to a flooring professional who can advise you on the best options for your particular circumstances.

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Johnathan Updyke
Johnathan Updyke

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